Astrophotography  
by  Jim Vineyard
Please note:
  All photos on this site were digitally enhanced with Picture Window Pro 2.5 and Adobe Photoshop LE unless otherwise noted.  All photographic guiding was performed with the Lumicon Giant Easy Guider and the SBIG model ST-4 autoguider as needed.
  Being a site devoted to the fine art of astro-photography, many of these photos are presented in a larger, higher resolution, and quality format which will result in slower download times as required to display them properly.
  A very special thank you to all those for without whose help and guidance this page simply would not exist!
Click on any photo below to view its full size version.
The Whirlpool Galaxy
            M51      
Welcome and thanks for stopping by!
Omega Centauri
The Center of Our
        Galaxy
The Orion Nebula
          M42
The Trifid Nebula
      All photographs and text on this website are Copyright 1996 through 2008 by Jim Vineyard and may not be reproduced in any form.  All rights reserved.
 
The Moon and Saturn
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The Dumbell Nebula
  The Ring Nebula
  The Helix Nebula
  M22
This site is highly optimized for your own 1024 x 768 software Display Setting with at least a 24 bit Color Setting.
The Bug Nebula
The Lagoon and
       Trifid
     Stars, Windmill,
  Flashlight, a Breeze
Total Lunar Eclipse
Transit of Mercury
Deep Sky with Planets
M31 at 135mm
Hale-Bopp over Palm Springs
Partial Solar Eclipse
Mars 2003
This page was last updated on: September 11, 2006
Important!
Adjust your monitor:  Within the blue frame below, you should be able to discern 17 distinct "equally sized" shaded rectangles from black labeled #1 to white labeled #17.  If you cannot see EACH of the 17 SEPARATE steps, adjust your monitor's (hardware) "Brightness" and "Contrast" until you can see all 17 shades.  As an added benefit of taking the time to do this, any further images you view on the Internet should appear closer to as their author intended.  Pay particular attention to differences between #1 & 2 and #16 & 17, as they are typically hardest to just barely discern.
1.
17.
This Calibration Method first provided courtesy of Mr.Chuck Vaughn.
Site Announcement:
As of April 2008 this page will no longer be updated.  It is presented only as an archive of some previous work in film-based astrophotography.